Hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p. Hearing and knowing music : the unpublished essays of Edward T. Cone (eBook, 2009) [cellosquare.com] 2019-03-13

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Cone, E. and Morgan, R.: Hearing and Knowing Music: The Unpublished Essays of Edward T. Cone (Hardcover and Ebook)

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

Let me make this absolutely clear by giving a familiar example—one in which the key is, or ought to be, self-evident, but one that is nevertheless often misinterpreted by audiences— whether because they are inattentive, or ill-trained, or just downright unmusical. Hearing and Knowing Music collects fourteen essays that Cone gave as talks in his later years and that were left unpublished at his death. In other words, only experience of music as a fine art can lead to understanding of music as a liberal art. But when Schumann, in Kinderscenen, Op. Cone Author: Edward T Cone; Robert P Morgan Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2009. Equally essential were my wife Carole Morgan, who undertook the task of converting the essays into digital form, and my friend and Yale colleague Ellen Rosand, who checked and corrected the Italian translations. Hearing and Knowing Music represents the final testament of one of our most important writers on music.

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Hearing and Knowing Music

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

Edited and introduced by Robert Morgan, these essays cover a broad range of topics, including music's position in culture, musical aesthetics, the significance of opera as an art, setting text to music, the nature of twentieth-century harmony and form, and the practice of musical analysis. With the exceptions noted, then, the essays had no prepared examples. It is, I think, more problematic, but I still think the experiential approach must be observed to avoid gross error. Jodi Beder, an accomplished professional musician herself, copyedited the entire manuscript with understanding and a light yet firm hand, saving me from countless errors. But, aided by our memory of the importance of the primal motif, C gradually assumes independence, representing its own triad. If on the other hand the passage is standing on the dominant, then it becomes a harmonic climax as well, and the final cadence is natural and satisfying. It did not seem to occur to him to try to impress those around him—even if he invariably did.

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Hearing and Knowing Music: The Unpublished Essays of Edward T. Cone

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

One gained a devoted friend and staunch ally—someone who could be critical yet remain gracious and understanding. He or she must follow those progressions and try to understand their significance. Not surprisingly, his name was included in a list of 250 distinguished Princeton graduates recently submitted by the Princeton Alumni Weekly to a committee charged with identifying the 25 most influential alumni ever to attend the university. For example, in order to enjoy a mystery story or a tale of suspense when we reread it, we must try to suppress our memory of its outcome. By mentioning Beethoven but none of his symphonies, Schubert but none of his songs, Wagner but none of his music dramas, the list seems to be saying: what is important is not familiarity with works of art, but knowledge of facts about them. Cone was one of the most important and influential music critics of the twentieth century.

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Hearing and Knowing Music

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

What harmonic associations are suggested by the opening measure? Note too that when the first phrase of movement three is repeated at m. I hear A as again expected. One might say that both the listener and the pianist must practice, that only through repeated hearings or playings can one comprehend the formal role, and therefore the expressive significance, of the passage. Edited and introduced by Robert Morgan, these essays cover a broad range of topics, including music's position in culture, musical aesthetics, the significance of opera as an art, setting text to music, the nature of twentieth-century harmony and form, and the practice of musical analysis. Every occurrence of the harmony, both within each song and between them, leads to an authentic cadence in A major instead.

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Hearing and knowing music: The unpublished essays of Edward T. Cone

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

But I believe that there is another equally important aspect of culture: shared experience. For Beethoven, Lydian could The Irrelevance of Tonality? The movements of the piece, low—high—low, static—moving—static, less—more—less dissonant, all reinforce one another regardless of the choice of tonic. No matter how well one knows the work, one must resist the urge to recall the theme or to auralize it before its actual realization; otherwise the felicitous effect of its welcome entrance will be nullified. And Cone occupied a special niche, as he always wrote from the perspective of a practicing musician. But in all cases I tried to follow Cone as closely as possible, retaining the content and character of his original text so that he could speak in his own voice.

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Cone, E. and Morgan, R.: Hearing and Knowing Music: The Unpublished Essays of Edward T. Cone (Hardcover and Ebook)

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

In addition, there are essays, such as one on Debussy, that lead Cone into areas he had not previously examined. That is because the key of the piece is crucial to the conception of its form and its expression. Whether music is a catalyst for virtuous or licentious behavior, decadent or sparse thoughts, there is no doubting its importance to human civilization; but what of the sounds of Nature? And if he is really acute, he will recognize that the composer is subtly recalling the same progression in the first movement. That reminds me of another crucial omission in the list: Arnold Schoenberg. For this to happen, one must transcend the particularities of human music so as to recognize the oneness of sounds arising from Nature. Or felt as a tonic. Only on that basis can one then begin to appreciate the role of music in our cultural history; only then can one realize that Western music is one of our proudest intellectual achievements.

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Cone, E. and Morgan, R.: Hearing and Knowing Music: The Unpublished Essays of Edward T. Cone (Hardcover and Ebook)

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

It is clearly in a key. Edited and introduced by Robert Morgan, these essays cover a broad range of topics, including music's position in culture, musical aesthetics, the significance of opera as an art, setting text to music, the nature of twentieth-century harmony and form, and the practice of musical analysis. The E-mail message field is required. They may indeed be extramusical, but they are not necessarily nonmusical. Morgan Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989. There is no doubt that Cone would have made significant alterations if he had published these essays himself—fleshing out some passages, compressing others, reworking formulations, and probably adding or deleting entire segments.

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Hearing and knowing music : the unpublished essays of Edward T. Cone (Book, 2009) [cellosquare.com]

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

The bulk of Leonard Bernstein's first book, The Joy of Music 1959 , consists of three imaginary conversations and seven scripts of Omnibus lectures intended for the education of lay audiences. Measure 5 might seem to be pushing on one step further in the sequence, toward V of B ex. He was a natural teacher, possessing passionate beliefs yet always respectful of conflicting ideas. The tonality here is just as crucial as it was in the Tchaikovsky. Does this mean that the real key is B? And if they think the piece is over, they have missed the point of the whole passage—maybe the point of the whole piece.

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Hearing and Knowing Music: The Unpublished Essays of Edward T. Cone by Edward T. Cone

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

That, however, is hardly likely; besides, at this point another 12 It may be somewhat temerarious of me to return to this battleground. Cone was undeniably a master of the lecture, and his trademark lucidity and good humor are apparent everywhere here. We are indebted indeed to Robert Morgan for this large, dazzling new trove of Cone's writings. And it is much easier to give a quick explanation of the twelve-tone method than of tonality which you really have to experience to understand. The climax is higher, louder, more dissonant than the beginning and end, and there is a clear sense of return. Neither Pitcher nor I know when most of these papers were written, or where they were first presented. Fully matching the quality and style of Cone's published writings, these essays mark a critical addition to his work, developing new ideas, such as the composer as critic; clarifying and modifying older positions, especially regarding opera and the nature of sung utterance; and adding new and often unexpected insights on composers and ideas previously discussed by Cone.

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Hearing and knowing music : the unpublished essays of Edward T. Cone (Book, 2009) [cellosquare.com]

hearing and knowing music cone edward t morgan robert p

But it is true for the arts as well. Edited and introduced by Robert Morgan, these essays c Edward T. Inevitably, the divisions are partly arbitrary. Their identification is not crucial. To have included all would have created an impractically long book; and deciding which ones to incorporate and where they should begin and end would have required arbitrary decisions. That means that for an understanding of a tonal piece it is crucial to know, not only that a piece is in a key, but also just what key it is in. Without that recognition of theme and memory of context the formal and expressive meanings of the passages are lost.

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